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  • Hollie Webb
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    Armando, that’s a great point about whistleblowing. I agree that it’s somewhat of a new phenomenon for many people worldwide. There is also often a stigma associated with whistleblowing. People sometimes view public sector whistleblowers as disloyal or even treasonous. I also agree that it will take a lot of public education and sensitization on the importance of whistleblowing in order for it to be more accepted. In order to fully protect whistleblowers and encourage reporting, we really have to build a culture that values integrity, transparency, and the ability to access information. And this is definitely not limited to SIDS. I live in the United States, and here, whistleblowers receive very mixed reactions from the public and even the media. They are often described as “leaking” information rather than whistleblowing or making a report, which has a much more negative connotation.

    Hollie Webb
    Moderator
    Post count: 5

    Another aspect of confidentiality is technological. If reports are allowed to be made online, reporting persons need to feel safe that the information they submit will be kept secure and not easily accessible via hacking. This means maintaining a certain level of internet security.

    Hollie Webb
    Moderator
    Post count: 5

    I think that Raj Awotarowa and May De Silva have both pointed out two aspects of confidentiality that are important to mention. Raj Awotarowa noted that the importance of police training as well as educating the public. Promoting integrity within the police force is vital to getting people to be willing to report corruption. In addition to having training and a code of conduct, it’s also important that police have a protocol in place for handling sensitive information and for dealing with reports.

    From a legislative perspective, I think it’s important that there are ways to address leaks of information regarding a witness or reporting person. However, if those laws are not enforced, it will be difficult for people to feel that they can safely report.

    Hollie Webb
    Moderator
    Post count: 5

    Koonjal- When I started my research, this is what I often found. Many countries enact legislation but often it has yet to be implemented because of a lack of resources or political will. In the Caribbean, multiple states have passed legislation and have worked to create programmes, such as the Justice Protection Programme in Jamaica. I know that Trinidad and Tobago has one as well. The Caribbean region is also unique in that some states do have regional agreements for witness relocation.

    Armando Joseph – Welcome, and I would love to hear any insight from Grenada!

    Hollie Webb
    Moderator
    Post count: 5

    Dear all,

    Thank you so much for inviting me to be here! I hope that you are all well and I appreciate the opportunity to discuss this topic with you. First, I want to start by saying that I am happy to answer any questions about my research, but I would love to hear your insights and experiences on this topic as well.

    As you know, corruption can be difficult to address anywhere in the world. Because it is often a secret crime, as Mr. Jheengut noted, without people willing to “blow the whistle” and then possibly act as a witness in a criminal trial, it can be almost impossible to fight. However, as May De Silva pointed out, for small island states, it can be difficult to fund a witness protection programme. Another challenge that SIDS face is size. Even in SIDS that consist of multiple islands, it is challenging to hide a person in a small area.

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