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  • Hossenbux
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    Post count: 5

    This is an excellent piece of work. Youth is the future of the country and the future must reflect optimism with a zero stance against corruption. Youth represents a significant portion of the population and is generally more open to social change and transformation, since they may have less interest in maintaining any status quo.

    Young citizens must be aware that they have the power to change things and thus eradicate corruption. Ethics, integrity and good governance should be part and parcel of their daily lives. .Corruption is dynamic and as such fighting corruption is a non-ending process. Emphasis must be laid on cognitive learning, ethical leadership and education to understand principles such as transparency, accountability and fairness.

    The war on corruption will be won by each and everyone of us playing our effective role in this fight.

    ‘God does not require us to succeed, He only requires that we try.’ Mother Theresa

    Hossenbux
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    I would also suggest that to encourage whistleblowing, a reward system, including extrinsic rewards, could be included as part of the whistleblower mechanism. This is already being carried out in many countries. A reward system might encourage the population to come forward for denouncing wrongdoers.

    Moreover, the media might also be addressed by whistleblowers to disclose wrongdoings publically. A functioning system of free and independent media is key to facilitating public disclosure, when appropriate.

    Hossenbux
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Protection of whistleblowers may also be provided for by specific provisions in different laws, such as in the criminal code, labour laws or laws regulating public servants.It should not be restricted to a specific anti-corruption law or to public servants/officials only. Employees from the private sector should also feel secure when denouncing corruption.

    In line with the above, amendments to our Mauritian criminal code may impose a fine and/or imprisonment for retaliation against a whistleblower that provides information on wrongdoers to an enforcement agency. A labour law, namely the Employment Rights Act, may protect workers against retaliation by employers when they report work-related offences. Whistleblower protection may also be provided for by specific laws, such as, competition laws, accounting laws, environmental protection laws, and company and securities laws.

    Hossenbux
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Dear Mrs Meyer,

    First of all, I want to thank you for your interesting comments regarding corruption aspects on climate change.

    I am Chief Corruption Prevention Officer at the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC), Mauritius. One of my core activities at the ICAC is to perform systems reviews in public bodies so as to improve their systems and procedures against risks of corruption and other forms of malpractices. In fact, several points raised in my last comment (e.g. policies and procedures, oversight mechanisms, conflict of interests, etc.) are also mentioned in recommendations as contained in our corruption prevention reports as they are means and ways to increase transparency, accountability and fairness in the different activities of public bodies.

    However, as far as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is concerned, unfortunately, we have not conducted much research on this issue. I have shared this CSR idea based on some internet search and as per international best practices on how to tackle corruption in climate change. But, I am of the opinion that it is essential to increase our knowledge pertaining to this issue and subsequently perform some more research and studies regarding CSR.

    Thank you
    Y. Hossenbux

    Hossenbux
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Climate change is arguably one of the biggest challenges we need to face. Huge money is spent and needed to prevent and respond to it. Big financial transaction means tempting opportunities for corruption and other forms of malpractices. We thus need a transparent effective and accountable climate governance framework. What are the possible solutions?

    • Documented policies and procedures must be developed in an open way. And everyone affected must take part. Then, corruption prevention measures must be implemented at all levels. They must be in line so as to ensure transparent and accountable decisions to manage climate change. They include management of conflict of interests, development of codes of conduct, awareness programs and conducts of corruption risk assessment exercises.

    • Moreover existing environmental legislations/regulations do not necessarily address acts of corruption. They provide the regulatory framework which essentially must be complemented with other strategies which seek to prevent and detect corruption risks. Moreover, penalties should be more rigid. Higher penalties may function as a deterrent and help offset the lack of control and oversight.

    • We must build checks and balances into climate policy. Independent oversight bodies are also needed. But they must have salaried staff with technical expertise with regard to climate change.

    • Private companies must disclose their positions on climate policy and climate change. For example: Which causes do they support? What are their Corporate Social Responsibilty (CSR) roles in helping communities affected by climate change?

    Thanks
    Y. Hossenbux

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